Tag Archives: rehabilitation

Amazing Idea about Lotto funding regional rehab & mental health facilities

Been having a really hard time of it, Monday morning was horrific as you will see from my YouTube channel and what I was chalking on the street.  When I go through these severe traumas (suicidal episodes alone because I am refused entitlements under law), which are as significant as your best friend trying to kill you, I often become highly creative.  That is one of the only advantages of my CPTSD, this creativity not only inspires my poetry and art it inspires me to find viable solutions to the situations those in power say they want to repair in our dysfunctional society.

Anyway, I make phone calls, that’s my thing, police must hate me cause I sure they get a few calls when I lose it at people who become insulting and patronising – note I do not threaten harm I just become insulting and swearing, ie I go tourettes (it is a recognised aspect of my disability now – it distresses and harms me too).  Anyway I phoned Lotto about their current advertising campaign about everybody caring for each other and pointed out this was not true in the darklands I live rotting on welfare thanks to ACC etc.  I became distraught, it didn’t go well, but the girl said someone would phone me back.

I got a lovely phone call from a young woman and they going to look at the advertising, considering the state of housing, violence, crime and suicide at the moment, based on my comments.  I also asked her how I could have a voice and tell her my ideas about refocusing charity on to people in need.  Look up ANY DICTIONARY – MINE IS THE OXFORD I GOT WHILE STUDYING LAW AT VICTORIA IN 2001.  Providing for people in need was the dictionary definition until our Orwellian government changed the law to change the meaning.  Which included extravagant sports, arts and business promotion projects.  All for the middle class and rich, while people in real need of the necessities of life, like safety, a safe stable affordable home, a dignified life, valuable jobs, food (without begging for it) became more and more persecuted and impoverished.

This is what fuels our violence, self-harm, addiction and suicide statistics and I challenge anybody to a debate on that topic.  This is what makes wealthy immigrants able to buy land in New Zealand while those PURPOSELY IMPOVERISHED locals cannot.  This is what creates homelessness, domestic violence and trauma in the local population.  There are very bad people involved in our government that do this purposely because of their extremist neo-liberal beliefs.

Since I spoke to her the ideas have been rushing through my head as to how it would all work.  Being built over a short time by each community, using resources diverted from commercial business and local businesses and volunteers that just want to help.  With Lotto leading the way it could be co-ordinated I know it could.  Once people got the concept.

Am referring everybody to my solutions page, please share with everybody you know.  Print out my information and take it to your local MP.  Send it to the Minister, send it to the Lotteries Grants Board and say you support my ideas.

I envisage the money from Lotto might only  need to be diverted for a limited period of time (the America’s Cup team might have to forego their millions in charity money for a while).  This would be something you could really call HOPE for 100,000s disabled and poor New Zealand victims of crime.  Homes created for these people, which is required under law, will mean other houses are left vacant for working families AND THE COSTS OF RENT WILL COME DOWN.  The I Am Hope campaign is nothing more than an insult to those who have been purposely disenfranchised and persecuted by neo-liberal extremism.  Please educate yourself about neo-liberalism, Chris Hedges and Prof David Harvey a good place to start.

The more I think about it the more excited I get, how could anybody argue with my reasoning and the benefits to our communities in so many ways.  Do we continue to lead the world in domestic/flatmate violence, youth suicide, self-harm and homelessness or do we actually show what it means to be a New Zealander, a Pakeha and Maori.  More than that to be a citizen of this planet and adhere to constitutional laws and United Nations treaties/contracts we have signed, to reject neo-liberalism as a failed economic and social experiment.

I can picture it all coming together in my head, I’ve always been very good at seeing the big picture and as I have far more of the picture as to where the problems are with THE MARKET,   charity, the law, mental health, health and government this makes me very valuable.  I reakon we could lead the world in rehabilitation of victims of crime, teach other countries what to do, including extricating themselves from the grips of cruel immoral elitist neo-liberalism.  IT IS NOT OUR CULTURE AND I WILL NEVER ACCEPT IT EVER.

If I can pull this off and convince Lotteries Grants Board, woah the positive impacts are going to be massive.  It would help those perverting the charity system at the moment, like Trust House, to save face a little, if they turned their attention to my ideas and housing – not buying more pubs.  It would stop the plethora of really really bad, offensive, unprofessional, inappropriate MAN UP – stopping (creating) violence businesses – groan.

I can picture big warehouse type facilities where houses are being built by teams of people with all types of disabilities.   Surrounded by cranes and hoists, teams of people being supervised by professionals and volunteers (like at the mens sheds). Houses would be for people with all types of economic social and cultural NEEDS and disabilities.  Must be sustainably made.  This is after the banks (giving free loans for business who participate) and private companies muck in and help build the facilities I envisage.  Once these places were set up I know we could pump out 100,000s of houses in a matter of months if the entire country got involved.  Including university students.  Got to use the fit and healthy too.  Not so much big equipment, wouldn’t be safe with so many people on site.  (Have you ever seen Mormons put up one of their churches over a few days, its cool to watch.)  An initial national combined effort, that would create the resources and infrastructure to be sustainable – COMPLETELY WITHIN THE BUDGETS and resources we currently have available.

It is imperative however we ensure (as required by international and NZ law) the cultural rights of Pakeha and Maori who want to own sufficient land to support themselves in times of hardship.  I am a firm believer in the quarter acre section for those who have been bought up in those environments.  If we grew our own vegetables and shared them, we could send more overseas.  At the moment our foreign trade in food (eg dairy, kai moana and meat) is happening at the expense of the poorest in our society, THIS MUST NOT HAPPEN, for scientific reasons.  Te Tangata Te Tangata Te Tangata – It is triggering those affected most basic instincts of survival of the fittest and tribalism – it is uncivilised and our laws were designed to stop that.

Under Libertarian beliefs they supposed to be using charity to support people in need, how did that get perverted into supporting sports, arts and business projects, cycle trails for tourists, etc.  It was the Charities Act  http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2005/0039/latest/DLM344368.html  (Note: arts for people who suffer trauma is a recognised medical therapy, extravagant arts projects like the giant screw installed across from Trust House at the roundabout in Masterton, is an insulting offensive $350,000 abomination.)

Surprise surprise, those in power went mad and started using charity to advance the rich and persecute then exploit us peasants.  Like that hasn’t happened many of times since the beginning of recorded history.  The most disturbing part now is HOW HAVE INTELLECTUALS AND JUSTICE SYSTEM LET IT GET THIS BAD, it is beyond me how an intelligent society with laws and universities who do record history let this happen.  It is terrifying to me, that someone as insignificant, powerless and disabled as me is the one saying WOAH this isn’t right and this has to stop.

Lets hope my 17 years of dogged determination, research and knowledge pays off.  Knowledge is power they reakon.  And what does not destroy you makes you stronger.  Two sayings I have on my wall.   The years of knowledge I now have and the times I have almost been destroyed by criminal neglect/negligence inciting suicide – I must be the most powerful person on the planet.

I want those who being hurt like I do and feel like I do to remember NON-VIOLENCE is the only way to defeat those in power who incite this HATE.  To all those who don’t understand what incites violence, suicide and crime I AM SURE you will understand what I am suggesting is definitely going to provide HOPE – real HOPE – real SUPPORT – real PEACE in our society.  Not just talking and marketing that changes nothing, as we have seen for the past 30 years, groan.

Kia kaha and aroha to us all – Pakeha and Maori – lets make this work – lets show the world it can work.  Capitalism and Democracy I mean, not the opposite of that, neo-liberalism – definitely not neo-liberalism – definitely definitely not.

A new era in mental health care – Regional Rehabilitation Facilities – New Zealand

Another idea to submit for funding for the Innovation Fund – we desperately need this – we are entitled to it.  Could also work in with the Regional Rehabilitation Centres.

GOVERNMENT REGIONAL MENTAL HEALTH FACILITIES

 

Attached please find a rehabilitation model and business plan for Mental Injury Services which outlines where I believe mental health care for mentally injured abuse victims and traumatised people should be going (also for some mentally ill people).  Mental injury being different in nature to mental illness because mental injury is a ‘normal’ person that has been subjected to overwhelming trauma and needs help to recover.  Mental illness is more permanent and requires ongoing care and support.

 

To provide the professional treatment care habilitation and rehabilitation people with mental injury or illness require there needs to be regional mental health facilities.  Shutting down the extensive mental health facilities in the 1990s (based on improving someone’s human rights – when it actually adversely affected these disabled people more)  is incomprehensible and allowing it to continue is reprehensible.  On the news tonight yet another mentally ill man living in the community has killed, this time his mother, an elderly couple and badly injured his father.  There should be better secure facilities for dangerously mentally ill people, the mental health facilities I am advocating for here do not include these people – this is a Fence At the Top of the Cliff – not ambulance at the bottom.  Until people could prove they are safe they would not have access to these facilities.

 

It is too distressing for me to go into the extensive reasons New Zealand (and many other countries) desperately need facilities and safe housing for people with mental health issues.  Facilities to help them heal and those to help them keep busy and feel valued. 

 

The extensive use of pharmaceuticals to try and control people, who more importantly need the basic needs met (please refer Maslow’s Heirachy of Needs), is part of the failure of mental health services and a gross miscarriage of justice.  The use of pharmaceuticals was a result of neo-liberal theories that it was cheaper to give a person a drug and put them in the community than actually providing professional treatment care and rehabilitation.  News reports have stated the government undertook to make the mental health services drug based to save money – it hasn’t.  Many of these drugs are highly experimental and have been linked to increases in psychopathy, suicide, mass murders and psychosis.  All the things they are supposed stop, they actually create.

 

I envisage these mental health centres be based on professional rehabilitation practices with client based approach and practical therapies like gardening – opportunities to participate in growing food etc.  Working in the earth is very good therapy and can be used to reduce stress if the person goes back in the community.  Group therapy is important as people will need to be able to communicate and support each other in the community, learning skills here will help in society.  It will help people who have been mentally injured pass on what they learn and experience to others. 

 

Art is another huge part of healing and therapy in the area of mental health with traumatised people having highly active right brains.  People should be able to explore their creativity and see it come to fruition if possible.  The cultural value for society is extensive and could lead to further work and recognition outside the mental health facility.  Talent could be identified and advanced with advocacy.  I envisage cultural events like plays, exhibitions etc that would entertain international visitors along with making souvenirs perhaps. 

 

I envisage six week ‘retreats’ for mentally injured people with rehabilitation in the community prior to the retreats and following them, until the person is well enough to live independently, if that is possible.

 

ACC to build regional mental health facilities to cater to the people I have described above.  Put the $billions they have invested in foreign markets, businesses that destroy the planet, security providers, into building these facilities.  Make them of a very high quality using sustainable building practices, similar to the Regional Rehabilitation Centres.  The mental health facilities will have accommodation for clients and support staff – mental health challenges happen 24 hours a day seven days a week.

The Innovation of Collaboration – Regional Rehabilitation Centres in New Zealand

Am currently writing my submission for government innovation funding and felt I needed to put it on my website.  I’m only half way through editing and will post the finalised version soon.  Information on this website will make up part of my submission – have to keep focused on moving forward and doing what I know is right – as the current situation with police, ACC and others is dragging me into the darklands of hell on a regular basis.

Kia kaha to us all – NECESSITY IS THE MOTHER OF INVENTION – nobody can say I don’t have solutions to the issues I repeatedly complain about.

DRAFT

The potential to positively transform New Zealand’s economic performance, the sustainability and integrity of our environment, help strengthen our society and give effect to the Treaty of Waitangi

 

Introduction

It is a fundamental flaw in neo-liberal capitalism that 80% of the people who are disabled in some way and cannot provide for themselves or not work at 100% capacity are consigned to lives of poverty and unfulfilled aspirations.  In my opinion it is the most serious sign of an uncivilised society to not provide for those less fortunate – allowing strong to attack weak is against multiple laws (including religious ones). 

 

My submission combines the medical sciences (particularly Occupational Therapy) with law and the untapped creativity and unrealised productivity of the 100,000s of disabled people living in New Zealand.  It also addresses issues successive governments and researchers have identified about unemployment, violence, addiction and suicide/mental health issues.

 

The three main areas of innovation I am applying for involve Disability Services, NZs Disabled Creative workforce and Mental Health – these would also be eligible for research funding as I envisage all three to be teaching and data gathering environments.

 

I am particularly guided in my innovations by government disability documents, signed United Nations documents, along with ACC, health, disability, criminal, imperial, human rights and Bill of Rights legislation.  Necessity being the mother of invention when your area of expertise is stress disorders, poverty, disability, law and living the current nightmare of social dysfunction created by radicalised capitalism (ie neo-liberalism).

Scientifically it is recognised that traumatised people have high blood flow to the right brain, the creative brain – a physiological change in how the brain functions that ensured the success of our species when confronted with life-threatening situations.  This is a state many disabled and mentally injured people now experience in our neo-liberal society.

 

Although my ideas fit within parts of the application for funding under this mechanism, there seems to be other parts which are barriers to the fulfilment of my ideas because I am not part of an organisation.  I would suggest this isolation, my 14 years of full time study in this area and my extensive breadth of knowledge and personal experience are what make me an innovator (with necessity being the mother of invention).  I see my ideas as an ‘innovation of collaboration’ by turning laws, research and rhetoric into practical useful resources and services for all citizens.

 

This is indeed an investment that focuses on long-term transformative impact for those affected by disability, poverty, violence, addiction, mental injury and mental illness.  This is a Top of The Cliff innovation in the area of mental health and welfare – not the current Bottom Of The Cliff mentality lead by people obsessed with neo-liberal economic theories of providing services to those who cost the most – eg those who end up in the justice system and causing harm in society.  In the area of disability caused by accident, including sexual and physical abuse, ACC are supposed to be the experts and have the resources to contribute significantly to ensure these innovations are realised quickly, professionally and regionally.  It would be fundamentally wrong and flawed to exclude people who were disabled by illness or born with disability – they have a right to work (and self-actualise) as do injured people – it would just require funding to come from a different avenue. 

 

I envisage some of the $4billion annual savings by ACC could be INVESTED in these centres and in the disabled people of New Zealand so they can contribute and have the opportunity to fulfil their potention.

 

I will also take this opportunity to suggest how these centres can be put into operation extremely quickly (which would also work for social housing).  As I walk around Wellington and travel the roads I see huge resources going into public and private works, resources that could be diverted for a very short time (say 2 weeks) to focus on these regional disability centres (and maybe the same done for mental health facilities – which I think are more appropriately set in more rural/quiet areas).  This would include site works – similar to what is happening on our roads and building works, like those used to refurbish Ministry of Health building, Ministry of Education and Victoria University.  Whatever resources are used, business people and tradespeople should have the opportunity to participate as an integral part of strengthening our society.

 

I believe suitable land should be taken under the Public Works Act and particularly from owners who are hampering development for personal gain.

 

My inspiration is watching television home renovation programmes and watching Mormon churches being built in very short time frames by large numbers of people.  I expect many people involved in such a project who I am sure would become proud of the part they play – especially when the rewards of such work become realised (I predict significant almost instantaneous decreases in violence, addiction and suicide statistics).

 

Such a large project would of course take some organisation, however it would be easily done as we have many people in New Zealand who have had experience.

 

It may of course be more cost effective and appropriate to purchase an existing building for conversion in some cases – as I see these rehabilitation centres being near the heart of our communities rather than on the fringes, while, as I said above, the mental health rehabilitation centres being in quieter more healing environments.

 

 

GOVERNMENT REGIONAL REHABILTATION CENTRES

 

It has been proven to me repeatedly and based on professional research that Non-Government Organisations do not work in mental health environments – which I see each of these areas being.    It has also been proven that basing mental health care on the current drug based experimental system, which fails to provide the necessaries of life (as outlined by Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs) is also a failure.

 

At a recent event organised by the Human Rights Commission the Special Rapporteur for Disability advised that as Governments had signed the Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities in 2008 and other United Nations documents, it was their responsibility to provide the services/resources required to fulfil its obligations, not ‘the community’.  Four years ago I was also part of an event that discussed fiscal responsibility in the area of crime, where a speaker (Mike Bazette) referred to extensive studies in UK that pointed to NGOs being unreliable and untrustworthy to deal with with disabled people who had high needs/challenging behavioural issues (ie they said one thing and did another).  As a result those clients who society wanted to get more services actually got less, which caused significant increases in crime, violence, addiction and social dysfunction.  I can confirm this is happening in New Zealand currently, also with the government demanding public mental health services operate under commercial models, it is happening in this system.

 

It is a neo-liberal philosophy to introduce as much private enterprise into all aspects of our society, including health care, to this end governments have made it more and more difficult for people to access health care so they are driven by necessity and desperation to pay for it themselves (eg Capri Hospital & increasing need for health insurance).  If they cannot pay for it themselves they are subject to ongoing persecution and inhuman living environments.  Recent advertising by Capri targeted middle class and affluent parents of young people who had drug addiction – offering far superior services to what the public system would.

 

In more recent times neo-liberalism has been exposed as an extremely socially destructive economic philosophy with all the outcomes contributing to inequality (concentrations of power and money in small groups with unprecedented political influence), poverty, violence, addiction, suicide, unemployment and under-employment. 

 

A series of documentaries called The Hard Stuff by Nigel Latta touched on some of the issues this radicalised form of capitalism has created in NZ and other modern societies.  So have documentaries by Bryan Bruce.  A premise of neo-liberalism is everybody is responsible for themselves which contradicts human nature and us as social animals living in large organised ‘civilised’ societies, reliant on each other for physical and psychological good health.

  

Every region in New Zealand should have a habilitation/rehabilitation centre where people with disabilities of all types can go and work, within the capabilities, doing worthwhile rewarding work that fulfils their self-actualising, psychosocial and physical needs.

 

I envisage these centres to consist of a large warehouses capable of building homes for disabled people.  Housing being the greatest area of need and unmet government responsibility at the moment, building houses is the most practical thing to do, especially with disabled people being the most adversely affected by the current severe housing shortages.

 

“In times of high unemployment it is disabled people who suffer most.”

Person to Person, Lindsay Gething, 3rd ed 2006

 

These centres would also be training places for Occupational Safety and Health professionals, health workers, Occupation Therapists, etc and research and development in the area of disability support services/devices.  Work would be done by teams, based on the capabilities and talents of the disabled person working with others however no mentally injured sex offenders working with mentally injured abuse victims, or potentially dangerous people working with vulnerable.  Developing teams and schedules would be done with mental health professionals to ensure supportive safe environments.

 

These Centres would be available to all physically and psychologically disabled people.  Will run using professionals in health and habilitation and rehabilitation processes and models.  It will also follow legal requirements. 

 

I have spoken to several people with disabilities who are unable to work and they were extremely enthusiastic about the idea of being able to work in a group doing something within their capabilities and valuable to society.  A man I know with a bad back, he injured when a child, was very keen to be part of a centre like this.  He and I have talked about the isolation of being unemployed and being despised for it, it seemed especially difficult for a man.  Because he can do some things on good days he couldn’t work for a traditional employer because of his need to not sit too long or stand too long – or not be able to work at all on bad days.  Sadly people saw him selling scrap metal and judged him for being a bludger on welfare.

 

I can picture these rehab centres with 2 or 3 houses at various stages of completion, surrounded by equipment that would enable people with physical disabilities to work.  Equipment that perhaps could be developed and improved with onsite collaboration between disabled people and engineers.  Surrounded by specially designed scaffolding.  There would be rooms for health care/rehabilitation professionals, rooms for massage, physiotherapy and rest for clients. 

 

Healthy food would be provided so people didn’t have to do their own meals and some of those people who prepared it should also be disabled, perhaps adding variety to their weeks work and could get training as well.  There should be gardens attached to the rehabilitation centre to provide vegetables and fruit as growing food is an important life skill when you don’t have a lot of money and extremely good therapy. 

 

There must be a good transport network for people attending these rehabilitation centres, they should be picked up at their door and taken home, if they need that. 

 

Given New Zealands need for an increased labour force during fruit picking season that teams of disabled people with specialist equipment for these jobs are sent to work in orchards, market gardens, etc.  Remuneration for their work would be paid to the Rehabilitation Centre and distributed in a fair manner.  Disabled should could also be considered a flexible labour force and centres should allow for this.

 

Disabled people working at rehabilitation centres must be paid a reasonable wage (provided a reasonable income) with perhaps 2-3 different pay grades.  Every person who contributes to building a house in some way should be eligible to own one of those houses when available (or perhaps be eligible for a state house loan).  It is a cultural and human right to own your own home and disabled people who are unable to work should not be excluded from this.  There are multiple economic and social advantages to society for a disabled vulnerable person to have their own safe home to live in, especially as they age.   This would also be adhering to the Disability Action Plan and Strategy and Declaration on Disabled Rights, also Human Rights and economic rights.

These rehabilitation centres would be a hub of employment for support workers, educators, tradespeople and health professionals.  Also places where able bodied and disabled people undertook formal training that was absent from the local community or not.

 

This regional rehabilitation centre idea came to me during a recent meeting on disability rights (at Te Papa with Catarina Aguila), a tall/large tetraplegic man in a wheelchair spoke about not having access to most disabled areas because his wheelchair was so large.  He was obvious an intelligent man around 30 and deeply distressed by his physical impairments.  I thought about what he could do in this facility and pictured him organising building materials and managing work plans for upcoming construction, on the phone a lot or a specialised computer as he had very limited use of his hands.

 

Many years ago I read a book called Think and Grow Rich (rich in all areas of life) and it talked a lot about being rich in potential and just finding out what that potential was, irrelevant of perceived limitations.  For example a man taught his partially deaf son that his disability was going to be an advantage when he was a man not a hindrance.  The boy ended up being a very successful sales rep and developer for a hearing aid manufacturer.

 

People at these rehabilitation centres should also have access to business, research and development funding and resources, so we can tap into people’s creativity.  I believe giving disabled people the opportunity to reach their potential (also self-actualise) would be a competitive advantage internationally.

 

The psycho-social benefits of these regional rehabilitation centres cannot be under-estimated with the WHO and UN identifying the increasing problems with social cohesion in developed countries.  These centres will strengthen our society.

 

I have never ever met a person who doesn’t want to work, especially a disabled person, but nobody should be expected to work in physical pain and no intelligent person should be expected to do particularly mundane work for long periods of time.  These centres should be about balance and those things identified as necessaries of a good life in Maslow’s Heirachy of Needs.

 

I believe through these rehabilitation centres people with ‘talents’ could be identified and placed in jobs in public and private enterprise – or contracted to them perhaps.  I know personally in mental health there are some very intelligent people – in fact intelligence can worsen mental health issues in many cases.  Many of these people are also highly creative, innovation and creativity being something Nigel Latta identified in his recent documentary as important to the development of a high wage economy and lowering of unemployment and poverty.

 

It is imperative and sensible for the homes (or other things) manufactured/created in these centres use sustainable, environmentally friendly products as a priority.   That they also support NZ manufacturers to avoid miles travelled where possible.  They should have their own electricity generation options, like solar, window power, dynamos, etc.

 

The nature of the centres will allow for experimentation and labour intensive manufacturing/construction, areas the private sector avoids.  I envisages houses being made with extra wide doorways, large bathrooms, etc.  Also manufacturing of special features in the centre.  Designed and built with specific disabled people in mind, working with the person and Occupational Therapists.

 

Support of disabled workers to be run through multi-disciplinary teams, as outlined in Shrawan Kumar’s book Multi-disciplinary Approach to Rehabilitation.

 

 

GOVERNMENT REGIONAL MENTAL HEALTH FACILITIES

Attached please find a rehabilitation model and business plan for Mental Injury Services which outlines where I believe mental health care for mentally injured abuse victims, traumatised people should be going (also for some mentally ill people).  Mental injury being different in nature to mental illness because mental injury is a ‘normal’ person that has been subjected to overwhelming trauma and needs help to recover.  Mental illness is more permanent and requires ongoing care and support.

 

To provide the professional treatment care and rehabilitation people with mental injury or illness require there needs to be regional mental health facilities.  Shutting down mental health facilities based on improving someone’s human rights – when it actually adversely affected these disabled people more is incomprehensible – and allowing it to continue reprehensible.  On the news tonight yet another mentally ill man living in the community has killed, this time his mother and badly injured his father. 

 

It is too distressing for me to go into the extensive reasons New Zealand (and many other countries) desperately need facilities and safe housing for people with mental health issues.  Facilities to help them heal and those to help them keep busy and feel valued.  The extensive use of pharmaceuticals to try and control people who more importantly need the basic needs met (please refer Maslow’s Heirachy of Needs) is a gross miscarriage of justice.  The use of pharmaceuticals was a result of neo-liberal theories that it was cheaper to give a person a drug and put them in the community than actually providing professional treatment care and rehabilitation.  News reports have stated the government undertook to make the mental health services drug based to save money – it hasn’t.  Many of these drugs are highly experimental and have been linked to increases in psychopathy, suicide, mass murders and psychosis.  All the things they are supposed stop, they actually create.

 

I envisage these mental health centres be based on holistic practices with opportunities to participate in growing food etc – working in the earth is very good therapy and can be used once the person is back in the community.  Group therapy is important as people will need to be able to communicate and support each other in the community, learning skills here could help in society.  Help people who have been mentally injured pass on what they learn and know to others.  Art is another huge part of healing and therapy in the area of mental health with traumatised people having highly active right brains.  People should be able to explore their creativity and see it come to fruition if possible.  The cultural value for society is extensive and could lead to further work and recognition outside the mental health facility.  Talent could be identified and advanced with advocacy.

 

I envisage six week ‘retreats’ for mentally injured people with rehabilitation in the community prior to the retreats and following them, until the person is well enough to live independently.